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Principles of Classical Pedagogy

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  1. Introduction
    Introduction: An Overview of the Principles of Classical Pedagogy (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Festina Lente (Preview Content)
    6 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: Multum Non Multa
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Repetitio Mater Memoriae
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: Embodied Learning 1—Rhythms, Practices, Traditions, Routines
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Embodied Learning 2—Visual Tour
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Embodied Learning 3—Liturgical Learning
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Songs, Chants, and Jingles
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Wonder and Curiosity
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Educational Virtue 1—Cultivating Habits of Learning
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Educational Virtue 2—Cultivating Habits of Learning
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Educational Virtue 3—Cultivating Habits of Learning
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Scholé and Contemplation (Restful Learning)
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 13: Docendo Discimus (By Teaching We Learn)
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  15. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Principles of Pedagogy
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What is the connection between liturgy and the cultivation of virtue?
  • Why are ecclesial liturgies a rich source for educational practices?
  • What are some other “liturgies” that you can imagine employing in your teaching?
  • Do we employ a “teaching liturgy”—whether we are conscious of it or not?
  • A better liturgy was to commonplace and to work through nectar gathering. This liturgy says that books are to be wondered and marveled at. Creative projects lead to the understanding that the fruit of education is not regurgitation but creation. Virtue becomes something that students live in their lives. Compare this summary of the impact of the liturgy of Lectio, Meditatio, Compositio with the impact of liturgy that requires students to read alone in order to study for a test.
  • In The Abolition of Man, C.S. Lewis says that virtue is the result of having emotions that are trained by habit. How are you attentive to habits in your school or homeschool both within classes and within the whole school day?
  • How might you prioritize slowing down in order for your students to grow in virtue through following classroom liturgies like those presented in this session? How is embodied education connected to other principles of classical education?