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Reading and Teaching The Odyssey

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: How to Read Homer by Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Interview with Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Interview with Tutor Hannah Hintze
    2Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: Lecture on Homer: "The Leaf Bed"
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Seminar #1 on The Odyssey
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Lecture on Homer: "To Hades and Back Again"
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Seminar #2 on The Odyssey
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Lecture on Homer: "The Cattle of the Sun"
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Seminar #3 on The Odyssey
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 12: Seminar #4 on The Odyssey
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 13: Post-Seminar Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: The Odyssey
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What do you think about the St. John’s curriculum?
  • What do you think about how tutors must be able to teach in any part of the curriculum?
  • If Odysseus’s “last adventure” will be to go inland where the inhabitants don’t even recognize oars, can we draw a conclusion about the contrast between this late-life journey and one that risks dramatic death by drowning? How do you think this last adventure could bring closure to Odysseus’s journeys?
  • Hintze says that Penelope is young for her age and she imagines dying tragically, as young people often do. Yet dying dramatically and “tragically” is, in a way, what kleos is all about. Is kleos in its essence a young person’s ideal? How does this tie in with the epic’s concept of often undignified mortality?