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A Brief History of Classical Education

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Classical and Medieval Ideas of Leisure and Learning (Preview Content)
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: The History of American Education (Preview Content)
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Education in the Medieval World
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: The History of Ancient Education
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Leisure and the Beautiful
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Aristotle and Classical Education
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Aristotle and Classical Education—Continued
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Aristotle and Classical Education—Continued
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Plato and Classical Education
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Plato and Classical Education—Continued
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Summary and Conclusion
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Discussions
    Discussion 1: Scholé (Leisure) and Classical Education
  13. Discussion 2: The True, Good, and Beautiful in Classical Education
  14. Discussion 3: American and Classical Education Compared
  15. Discussion 4: Vocational Training and Classical Education
  16. Discussion 5: Classical Education and the "Yearning for Being"
  17. Discussion 6: Univ. of Dallas Grad Program for Classical Teachers
  18. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Brief History of Classical Education
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States” by Howard Chandler Christy

“I should as soon think of closing all my window shutters to enable me to see as of banishing the Classicks to improve Republican ideas.”
– John Adams writing to Dr. Benjamin Rush, June 19, 1789

“You ask my opinion on the extent to which classical learning should be carried in our country. … The utilities we derive from the remains of the Greek and Latin languages are, first, as models of pure taste in writing. To these we are certainly indebted for the national and caste style of modern composition which so much distinguishes the nations to whom these languages are familiar… Second. Among the values of classical learning, I estimate the luxury of reading the Greek and Roman authors in all the beauties of their originals. And why should not this innocent and elegant luxury take its prëeminent stand ahead of all those addressed merely to the senses? I think myself more indebted to my father for this than for all the other luxuries his cares and affections have placed within my reach; and more now than when younger, and more susceptible of delights from other sources. When the decay of age have enfeebled the useful energies of the mind, the classic pages fill up the vacuum of ennui, and become sweet composers to that rest of the grave into which we are all sooner or later to descend. Third. A third value is in the stores of real science deposited and transmitted us in these languages, to-wit: in history, ethics, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, natural history, &c. But to whom are these things useful? … I know it is often said there have been shining examples of men of great abilities in all the businesses of life, without any other science than what they had gathered from conversations and intercourse with the world. But who can say what these men would not have been had they started in the science on the shoulders of a Demosthenes or Cicero, of a Locke or Bacon, or Newton? To sum the whole, therefore, it may truly be said that the classical languages are a solid basis for most, and an ornament to all the sciences.”
– Thomas Jefferson writing to John Brazier, 1819