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A Brief History of Classical Education

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Classical and Medieval Ideas of Leisure and Learning (Preview Content)
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: The History of American Education (Preview Content)
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Education in the Medieval World
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: The History of Ancient Education
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Leisure and the Beautiful
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Aristotle and Classical Education
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Aristotle and Classical Education—Continued
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Aristotle and Classical Education—Continued
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Plato and Classical Education
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Plato and Classical Education—Continued
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Summary and Conclusion
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Discussions
    Discussion 1: Scholé (Leisure) and Classical Education
  13. Discussion 2: The True, Good, and Beautiful in Classical Education
  14. Discussion 3: American and Classical Education Compared
  15. Discussion 4: Vocational Training and Classical Education
  16. Discussion 5: Classical Education and the "Yearning for Being"
  17. Discussion 6: Univ. of Dallas Grad Program for Classical Teachers
  18. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Brief History of Classical Education
    1 Quiz
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“No one did more than he to establish in the minds of the American people the conception that education should be universal, non-sectarian, free, and that its aims should be social efficiency, civic virtue, and character, rather than mere learning or the advancement of education ends.”
– A description of Mann by Ellwood P.Cubberley (1919) in “Public Education in the United States.” p. 167

“Essentially his message centered on six fundamental propositions: (1) that a republic cannot long remain ignorant and free, hence the necessity of universal popular education; (2) that such education must be paid for, controlled, and sustained by an interested public; (3) that such education is best provided in schools embracing children of all religious, social, and ethnic backgrounds; (4) that such education, while profoundly moral in character, must be free of sectarian religious influence; (5) that such education must be permeated throughout by the spirit, methods, and discipline of a free society, which preclude harsh pedagogy in the classroom; and (6) that such education can be provided only by well-trained, professional teachers. Mann encountered strong resistance to these ideas—from clergymen who deplored nonsectarian schools, from educators who condemned his pedagogy as subversive of classroom authority, and from politicians who opposed the board as an improper infringement of local educational authority—but his views prevailed.”
– A description of Horace Mann’s educational principles from the Encyclopedia Britannica