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Scholé Muses 2: Classical Education at Home: Curriculum and Pedagogy

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Classical Pedagogy in the Homeschool (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Learning to Love What is Lovely (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Employing a Classical Curriculum
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: Why Latin is a Superior Choice
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Classical Pedagogy that Leads a Child to Truth, Goodness, and Beauty
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Three Fundamental Principles and Practices of Classical Teaching Methods
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Cultivate Wonder in Our Teaching
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Cultivation of Virtue
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Practices that will Help us to Cultivate Virtue in Our Children
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Employ Embodied and Liturgical Teaching
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Practically Employ Embodied and Liturgical Teaching
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 12: What Socratic Discussion Is and Isn't
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Scholé Muses 2: Classical Education at Home: Curriculum and Pedagogy
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What is one thing you can do this week to practice leading a Socratic discussion in your homeschool? An example was given about a discussion around the topic of “What is a Hero?” What other topics you are currently studying with your students might you use as a jumping off point?
  • Andrew Kern at the CiRCE Institute talks of putting students in a gap that is disorienting because people can’t stand a void.  What do you think he means by this?  How can this apply to a Socratic teaching method?
  • Read Mark Chapter 10 and reflect on how Jesus is teaching the various people he encounters. What can you learn from this?