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Teaching Modern Political Philosophy

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  1. Introduction
    Intro: Teaching Modern Political Philosophy (Preview Content)
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Prefatory Comments (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Pt. 1
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Pt. 2
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Pt. 3
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: The Social Contract by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Pt. 4
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke, Pt. 1
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke, Pt. 2
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke, Pt. 3
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke, Pt. 4
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Pt. 1
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Pt. 2
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Hamlet by William Shakespeare
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 13: The Impossibility of Secular Society by Rémi Brague
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 14: Sin No More by Rémi Brague
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Teaching Modern Political Philosophy
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What questions can you ask students to open class about these chapters?
  • Practice making seven “I am” statements and ranking them in order of importance. Which of these associations can you actually leave behind?
  • Discuss the meaning of the following statement from Rousseau: If the general will is to be clearly expressed it is imperative that there should be no sectional associations in the state and that every citizen should make up his own mind for himself. What is mean by sectional associations?  How important is this statement to the Western tradition?