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Essential Philosophy

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  1. Introduction
    Introduction: Essential Philosophy (Preview Content)
    1Topic
  2. Dr. Schenk's Story: Essential Philosophy (Preview Content)
    1Topic
  3. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 1: Fundamental Distinctions Used in Philosophy (Preview Content)
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion 1: Paying Attention to Your Own Thinking
  5. Lesson 2: Popular Errors in Academia (Preview Content)
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion 2: Discussion of Three Common Academic Errors
  7. Lesson 3: Skepticism about Truth (Preview Content)
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 4: Three Examples of Faulty Reasoning
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 5: Ontology--The Study of Being
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    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion 3: Discussion of the Ontological Argument
  11. Lesson 6: Anselm’s Ontological Argument for the Existence of God
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 7: Anselm’s Ontological Argument Continued
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  13. Discussion 4: Alvin Plantinga's Contribution to Arguments for the Existence of God
  14. Lesson 8: Aquinas' Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God
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    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 9: Craig's Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God
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    1 Quiz
  16. Discussion 5: Why Do We Keep Arguing about the Existence of God?
  17. Lesson 10: Grunbaum’s Response to the Cosmological Argument
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    1 Quiz
  18. Discussion 6: Why is There Something and Not Nothing?
  19. Lesson 11: Introduction to the Problem of Evil
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    1 Quiz
  20. Lesson 12: Solution to the Problem of Evil
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  21. Discussion 7: The Problem of Evil
  22. Lesson 13: Theodicies for the Greater Good Argument
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    1 Quiz
  23. Lesson 14: William Rowe’s Evidential Version of the Problem of Evil Argument
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  24. Lesson 15: The Design Argument for the Existence of God
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    1 Quiz
  25. Lesson 16: The Fine-Tuning Argument for the Existence of God
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  26. Lesson 17: The Fine-Tuning Argument Continued
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  27. Discussion 8: The Fine-Tuning Argument
  28. Lesson 18: The Free Will Debate
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    1 Quiz
  29. Discussion 9: The Free Will Debate
  30. Lesson 19: David Hume's Radical Empiricism and Argument Against Causation
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    1 Quiz
  31. Lesson 20: Roderick Chisholm's Theory of Agency
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  32. Lesson 21:Chisholm's Critique of Hume's Compatibilist Theory of Action
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  33. Lesson 22: The Need for a Theory of Action
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  34. Lesson 23: Frankfurt's Theory of Action
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  35. Discussion 10: Why Educators Should Study Philosophy
  36. Discussion 11: Why Dr. Schenk Moved from Atheism to Theism
  37. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Essential Philosophy
    1 Quiz
Lesson 7, Topic 3
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Philosophers Mentioned in this Lecture

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In this lecture Dr. Schenk references the work of several philosophers, writers, and logicians you might be interested in reading more about. Below are brief introductions to these philosophers, along with links if you wish to learn more.

Gottlob Frege

Gottlob Frege (1848-1925) was a German philosopher, logician, and mathematician. Many consider him to be the father of analytic philosophy, or a method of approaching philosophical problems through analysis of the terms in which they are expressed. You can read more about Frege in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, available online here.

Jean-Francois Lyotard

Jean-Francois Lyotard (1924-1998) was a French philosopher, sociologist, and literary theorist. He was a leading figure in the postmodern intellectual movement. You might recall from Dr. Schenk’s lecture that Lyotard would support Skepticism About Truth, as he suggested that everyone has their own “lived truth.” You an read more about him in the Encyclopedia Britannica, available online here.

Roderick Chisholm

Roderick Chisholm (1916-1999) was a highly influential American philosopher whose work spanned epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and other branches of philosophy. In this lecture Dr. Schenk mentioned Chisholm’s work in regards to the set of criteria that must already exist if one wishes to attempt reducing truth, which contradicts the Skepticism About Truth argument. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy offers a wonderful overview of Chisholm’s life and works here.