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Essential Philosophy

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  1. Introduction
    Introduction: Essential Philosophy (Preview Content)
    1 Topic
  2. Dr. Schenk's Story: Essential Philosophy (Preview Content)
    1 Topic
  3. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 1: Fundamental Distinctions Used in Philosophy (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion 1: Paying Attention to Your Own Thinking
  5. Lesson 2: Popular Errors in Academia (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion 2: Discussion of Three Common Academic Errors
  7. Lesson 3: Skepticism about Truth (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 4: Three Examples of Faulty Reasoning
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 5: Ontology--The Study of Being
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion 3: Discussion of the Ontological Argument
  11. Lesson 6: Anselm’s Ontological Argument for the Existence of God
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 7: Anselm’s Ontological Argument Continued
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Discussion 4: Alvin Plantinga's Contribution to Arguments for the Existence of God
  14. Lesson 8: Aquinas' Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 9: Craig's Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  16. Discussion 5: Why Do We Keep Arguing about the Existence of God?
  17. Lesson 10: Grunbaum’s Response to the Cosmological Argument
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  18. Discussion 6: Why is There Something and Not Nothing?
  19. Lesson 11: Introduction to the Problem of Evil
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  20. Lesson 12: Solution to the Problem of Evil
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  21. Discussion 7: The Problem of Evil
  22. Lesson 13: Theodicies for the Greater Good Argument
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  23. Lesson 14: William Rowe’s Evidential Version of the Problem of Evil Argument
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  24. Lesson 15: The Design Argument for the Existence of God
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  25. Lesson 16: The Fine-Tuning Argument for the Existence of God
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  26. Lesson 17: The Fine-Tuning Argument Continued
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  27. Discussion 8: The Fine-Tuning Argument
  28. Lesson 18: The Free Will Debate
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  29. Discussion 9: The Free Will Debate
  30. Lesson 19: David Hume's Radical Empiricism and Argument Against Causation
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  31. Lesson 20: Roderick Chisholm's Theory of Agency
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  32. Lesson 21:Chisholm's Critique of Hume's Compatibilist Theory of Action
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  33. Lesson 22: The Need for a Theory of Action
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  34. Lesson 23: Frankfurt's Theory of Action
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  35. Discussion 10: Why Educators Should Study Philosophy
  36. Discussion 11: Why Dr. Schenk Moved from Atheism to Theism
  37. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Essential Philosophy
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • Dr. Schenk mentioned that Saint Anselm never used the term God in his argument, preferring to use “a being greater than which none can be conceived.” What does this do for his argument? How might this appeal to atheists (as well as others) approaching this argument?
  • In what ways do we still use the Hierarchy of Being in the 21st century world? What does the Hierarchy of Being suggest about the role of objective values in our world today?
  • Recall how Dr. Schenk talked about the on/off switch we might use to approach existence. We assume something either exits or it doesn’t. Contrasted with this is a Medieval person’s understanding of someone or something having existence in degrees. What did you consider as the concept of existence before this lecture? Have your ideas changed?
  • Finally, consider the 1st version of Saint Anselm’s Cosmological Argument covered in this lecture. Can you see how the argument builds from Premise (1) until its conclusion in Premise (5)? Take this time to fully understand or review the argument before moving on to the next lecture.