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Teaching Math Classically

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  1. Introduction
    Teaching Math Classically—Introduction: How to Teach Mathematics Well (Preview Content)
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: The State of Math Education in America (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: How to Improve Math Education in the US
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: The Trivium and Mathematics Education
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Grammar of Mathematics
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Mathematics, Memory, and Retained Learning
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Cultivating a Reflective and Collaborative Faculty
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Strategies for Reforming a Math Program
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 1
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 2
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Rhetoric in the Mathematics Classroom
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Taking a Liturgical Audit
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Constructing Mathematical Arguments
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 13: Mathematical Proofs Students Should Know
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 14: The Beauty of Math and Poetic Instruction
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 15: Teaching Math as Storytelling
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Lesson 16: Essential Elements for Teaching Math
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  18. Lesson 17: Mathematics as a Humanities Subject
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  19. Interviews
    Interview: Andrew Elizalde on Math Education
  20. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on How He Became Interested in Mathematics
    1 Topic
  21. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on His Journey into Classical Education
    1 Topic
  22. Interview: Bill Carey on Teaching Math Classically
  23. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Teaching Math Classically
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • Why do you think Andrew asks you to have your students think of solving equations not in terms of solutions, but in terms of mathematical compositions? How can that image help students think about the process of making mathematical arguments?
  • How can insisting that your students demonstrate step-by-step understanding help improve their mathematics vocabulary? How can it drive home the idea that math is logical and there is no “magic” involved?
  • What is Aristotle’s definition of rhetoric, and how can you help your students connect it with how they solve math equations? How can you involve the students’ “audience” more, and help them to recognize the common understanding that will allow them to use that knowledge in their arguments?
  • How does a student’s ability to begin to synthesize and “skip” steps help them grow in their skills in mathematical rhetoric (presenting an eloquent, persuasive argument to an audience based on what they know)? Could the use of rhetoric in the math classroom ever become problematic?