Back to Course

Teaching Math Classically

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Introduction
    Teaching Math Classically—Introduction: How to Teach Mathematics Well (Preview Content)
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: The State of Math Education in America (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: How to Improve Math Education in the US
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: The Trivium and Mathematics Education
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Grammar of Mathematics
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Mathematics, Memory, and Retained Learning
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Cultivating a Reflective and Collaborative Faculty
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Strategies for Reforming a Math Program
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 1
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 2
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Rhetoric in the Mathematics Classroom
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Taking a Liturgical Audit
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Constructing Mathematical Arguments
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 13: Mathematical Proofs Students Should Know
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 14: The Beauty of Math and Poetic Instruction
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 15: Teaching Math as Storytelling
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Lesson 16: Essential Elements for Teaching Math
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  18. Lesson 17: Mathematics as a Humanities Subject
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  19. Interviews
    Interview: Andrew Elizalde on Math Education
  20. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on How He Became Interested in Mathematics
    1 Topic
  21. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on His Journey into Classical Education
    1 Topic
  22. Interview: Bill Carey on Teaching Math Classically
  23. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Teaching Math Classically
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
0% Complete
  • Is the idea of conducting Socratic dialogue in mathematics a new one for you? How does the metaphor of a midwife attending the labor of a student to give birth to an idea help define your role? What new ideas does it bring to mind in how to use Socratic dialogue in your math classroom? How can its use in mathematics prepare students to use Socratic dialogue in other disciplines?
  • Having a student construct a carefully articulated idea and then critically examine it for flaws takes patience on the part of both student and teacher. What kinds of questions will you need to ask to bring about this kind of critical thinking? How will these questions vary from student to student, depending on ability and temperament?
  • Theaetetus seems to bear the repeated failure of his ideas with maturity and humility. How can teachers ensure that students with less resilience are not discouraged when their ideas prove to be “wind eggs”? What are some specific ideas you can implement to keep your Socratic dialogue a discussion that helps students to their feet again rather than a controversy that intentionally trips them up?
  • What are some ways your own experience with Socratic dialogue—and more specifically, the defeat and refinement of your ideas—has helped shape your character? What are some practical ideas to translate your own history with Socratic dialogue into appreciation for the process in your students? How can you help them recognize the opportunity to participate in their own learning experience?