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Teaching Math Classically

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  1. Introduction
    Teaching Math Classically—Introduction: How to Teach Mathematics Well (Preview Content)
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: The State of Math Education in America (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: How to Improve Math Education in the US
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: The Trivium and Mathematics Education
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Grammar of Mathematics
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Mathematics, Memory, and Retained Learning
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Cultivating a Reflective and Collaborative Faculty
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Strategies for Reforming a Math Program
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 1
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 2
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Rhetoric in the Mathematics Classroom
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Taking a Liturgical Audit
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Constructing Mathematical Arguments
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 13: Mathematical Proofs Students Should Know
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 14: The Beauty of Math and Poetic Instruction
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 15: Teaching Math as Storytelling
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Lesson 16: Essential Elements for Teaching Math
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  18. Lesson 17: Mathematics as a Humanities Subject
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  19. Interviews
    Interview: Andrew Elizalde on Math Education
  20. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on How He Became Interested in Mathematics
    1 Topic
  21. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on His Journey into Classical Education
    1 Topic
  22. Interview: Bill Carey on Teaching Math Classically
  23. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Teaching Math Classically
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • Where do your students stand on the issue of an objective versus a subjective idea of beauty? How much of a foundation will you have to lay for an objective standard of beauty before you can begin to draw their attention to the beauty of math?
  • How will the students’—and your—appreciation of truth, goodness, and beauty inform the students’ respect for mathematics? How can you broaden their idea of what makes mathematics beautiful? Would starting with Andrew’s suggestion for collectively making mathematical compositions beautiful be a helpful first step, or would your students need to start with the more abstract?
  • How does the poetic mode of instruction differ from the gymnastic, didactic, or dialectic? Have you tended to avoid the poetic mode? If you have not, what advice would you give to a teacher who has about its advantages and disadvantages? If you have, how does Andrew’s challenge to teachers at the end of the lecture help you take the first step toward implementing it?
  • In what ways does mathematics help us understand or interpret fine and performing arts? Can you think of any other ways math informs the arts that Andrew didn’t mention?
  • Had you ever considered before this lecture how effective the language of mathematics is at describing God’s creation? Were you surprised to hear how many mathematicians (Einstein, Galileo, Newton, Eugene Wigner) commented on this idea? How does it make you think differently about not only the mind of God, but how He has allowed us access to Him and to His world?