Back to Course

Teaching Math Classically

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Introduction
    Teaching Math Classically—Introduction: How to Teach Mathematics Well (Preview Content)
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: The State of Math Education in America (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: How to Improve Math Education in the US
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: The Trivium and Mathematics Education
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Grammar of Mathematics
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Mathematics, Memory, and Retained Learning
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Cultivating a Reflective and Collaborative Faculty
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Strategies for Reforming a Math Program
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 1
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Teaching Math with Socratic Dialogue—Part 2
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Rhetoric in the Mathematics Classroom
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Taking a Liturgical Audit
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Constructing Mathematical Arguments
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 13: Mathematical Proofs Students Should Know
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 14: The Beauty of Math and Poetic Instruction
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 15: Teaching Math as Storytelling
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Lesson 16: Essential Elements for Teaching Math
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  18. Lesson 17: Mathematics as a Humanities Subject
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  19. Interviews
    Interview: Andrew Elizalde on Math Education
  20. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on How He Became Interested in Mathematics
    1 Topic
  21. Interview: Andrew Elizalde on His Journey into Classical Education
    1 Topic
  22. Interview: Bill Carey on Teaching Math Classically
  23. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Teaching Math Classically
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
0% Complete
  • Bill Carey likens the way we sometimes do or teach math to learning to compose great music but never taking the time to listen to it, or working hard at a task but never having a resulting creation to show for it. How does looking at math as one of the humanities or as a language that expresses beauty change those comparisons?
  • If you have had a student (or more likely, students) ask you why the class has to learn this math lesson, how do you typically answer? Do students find your answer satisfying? What are some ways Bill suggests that teachers can provide both more compelling answers and more compelling lessons that might answer that question before it is raised?
  • Does the way Bill uses math in his cartography job surprise you? What about the way professional mathematicians dedicate so much of their time to writing compelling papers? Does either use make you rethink some of the ways you approach teaching math in your classroom? How can you provide more context from “the real world” for the essential mathematical formulas and functions?
  • When a student asks Bill how it can be fun to work on a math problem for two months, he answers that he has the freedom to take the time to explore and create while aiming to accomplish the larger vision (time stamp 48:30). How does his answer compare with the concept of scholé? How does it contrast? Can you find any inspiration in his answer for your classroom approach, or is it too impractical for day-to-day use?
  • In what ways can it be helpful to teach the history and drama of mathematics?
  • How does one balance teaching math as history with ensuring students learn actual content?
  • Did you learn “pi” as a formula to “plug-in” without any understanding of its origin? What do you think of Bill Carey’s method of requiring students to solve “pi”?