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Reading and Teaching The Odyssey

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: How to Read Homer by Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Interview with Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Interview with Tutor Hannah Hintze
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: Lecture on Homer: "The Leaf Bed"
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Seminar #1 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Lecture on Homer: "To Hades and Back Again"
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Seminar #2 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Lecture on Homer: "The Cattle of the Sun"
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Seminar #3 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 12: Seminar #4 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 13: Post-Seminar Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: The Odyssey
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What do you note about the ways in which Hannah Hintze leads this seminar?
  • Why do you think she chose the opening question that she did?
  • What do you note about the ways in which students treat the text?
  • What do you note about the ways in which students interact with one another?
  • Why do you think Odysseus wants to head toward the rising smoke? Why doesn’t he want to strike out into the ocean instead? What do you think of the idea the discussion considered about Odysseus wishing to pit himself against the “owner” of the smoke? Which points made by the participants seemed to best answer Dr. Hintze’s original question?
  • Why do Odysseus and his crew keep going on these adventures, especially when they have not been terribly successful? Why not just try to get directly home? How do the concepts of fate and prophecy come into play here?
  • What is it about the presence of Odysseus himself that inspires both Penelope and his crew (at least in one instance) to feel they are “home”? How does this idea coexist with the crew’s resentment of Odysseus? (Or does it?) Do you think it is his fame they grumble over, or the money and gifts, or something else?
  • Would you follow Odysseus? If he set aside his metis and his strategizing and instead “wandered” or waited on the gods like the cyclopes, would that sway your inclination? Why or why not?