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Reading and Teaching The Odyssey

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: How to Read Homer by Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Interview with Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Interview with Tutor Hannah Hintze (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: Lecture on Homer: "The Leaf Bed"
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Seminar #1 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Lecture on Homer: "To Hades and Back Again"
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Seminar #2 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Lecture on Homer: "The Cattle of the Sun"
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Seminar #3 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 12: Seminar #4 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 13: Post-Seminar Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: The Odyssey
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What do you think about the St. John’s curriculum?
  • What do you think about how tutors must be able to teach in any part of the curriculum?
  • Why do we find pleasure in stories, even if they’re terrible or tragic? What are some examples of terrible or tragic things in The Odyssey that you enjoy (in story form)?
  • Explain the idea of the comfort of recognizing that your experience is part of a grander human experience and you aren’t alone in it. How is this related or similar to catharsis (if it is)?
  • What does Dr. Hintze mean by “insoluble concreteness”? What examples does she mention to illustrate this? What are some others in The Odyssey?
  • What do you think of the end of The Odyssey? How does this relate to the idea of a work of fiction always being disappointing in the end? How does this circle back around to one of the epic’s main themes: human mortality?