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Reading and Teaching The Odyssey

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: How to Read Homer by Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Interview with Eva Brann (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 3: Interview with Tutor Hannah Hintze
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 4: Lecture on Homer: "The Leaf Bed"
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 5: Seminar #1 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 6: Lecture on Homer: "To Hades and Back Again"
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 7: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 8: Seminar #2 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 9: Lecture on Homer: "The Cattle of the Sun"
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 10: Post-Lecture Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 11: Seminar #3 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 12: Seminar #4 on The Odyssey
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 13: Post-Seminar Interview with Hannah Hintze
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: The Odyssey
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What do you note about the ways in which Hannah Hintze leads this seminar?
  • Why do you think she chose the opening question that she did?
  • What do you note about the ways in which students treat the text?
  • What do you note about the ways in which students interact with one another?
  • How would you answer these initial questions: “Why this homecoming for Odysseus? And so why arrive sleeping? Why arrive confused? Why Eumaeus? Why disguised?” Did you find any point(s) made by the students that gave you new insight or changed your mind?
  • Hintze asks why Odysseus arrives to a divine conversation for the first time. What answer would you give? What do you think Athena’s role was both in Odysseus’s homecoming, and the events leading up to it? Why does Odysseus go along with her plan? Is the mission that she assigns Odysseus necessary for his homecoming to be successful?
  • What different ways can you find that the theme of identity is used in Book 13? The students touch on the idea of Odysseus possibly looking for his own identity in the sense of who he is in relationship with others. Is this true for him in each of his roles—father, husband, warrior, and king? Or is his questioning and storytelling merely window dressing for his probing of the loyalties of others?
  • If you had a choice, would you follow a leader who had been as deceitful as Odysseus? Were his disguise and lies and testing justified somehow? Do his homecoming and the restoration of his kingship trump any ruses he uses to accomplish them? Does the role of the gods and their laws fit in this mix somehow?