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The Abolition of Man Book Study

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  1. Introduction
    Lesson 1: Introduction (Preview Content)
    6Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Discussion of Lecture 1 (Preview Content)
    5Topics
  3. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 2: The Abolition of Man in Context
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion of Lecture 2
    3Topics
  5. Lesson 3: Men without Chests
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion of Lecture 3
    1Topic
  7. Lesson 4: Moral versus Modern Education
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Discussion of Lecture 4
    1Topic
  9. Lesson 5: The Abolition of Man
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion of Lecture 5
    1Topic
  11. Lesson 6: Lewis's Predictions Fulfilled in Three Ways
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Discussion of Lecture 6
    1Topic
  13. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: The Abolition of Man
    1 Quiz
Lesson 4, Topic 3
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Discussion Questions

Lesson Progress
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  • How might thinking according to the economy of significance influence or change teaching in the classroom? For example, as Dr. Perrin mentioned, would it change how the day begins or ends?
  • How might the concept of education be linked to an economy of significance? How does education reflect larger, more infinite truths?
  • As Dr. Turley said, we are by default modernists. In what areas of our lives do we naturally adopt a nature/culture dichotomy? In what areas of our lives do we resist this?
  • The medieval imagination saw beauty in order, leading to such magnificent creations as the cathedral and monastery. Dr. Turley also mentioned the admiration we have for virtuosos and their command of order and perfection in music. What are some other examples in the Medieval Period, or modern times, whose order and beauty reflects the grandeur of God?