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Teaching the Great Books

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  1. Introduction
    Teaching the Great Books: Course Introduction (Preview Content)
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lessons
    Lesson 1: What Should We Read? (Preview Content)
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Lesson 2: How Should We Read the Classics?
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: How to Do Deep Reading
    5Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: Ancient and Modern Modes of Interpretation
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: How to Teach Great Books—Part I
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: How to Teach Great Books—Part II
    5Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Classroom Habits and Practices
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Who Do We Teach?
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Students Afflicted with Acedia or Ennui
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Helping Students Overcome Acedia or Ennui
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Who Is the Teacher?
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Class Observations
    Lesson 12: Observe 7th Grade Classroom (with preclass interview)
    1Topic
  14. Lesson 13: Observe 10th Grade Classroom (with pre- and post-class interviews)
    1Topic
  15. Lesson 14: Observe 10th Grade Classroom (with pre- and post-class interviews)
    1Topic
  16. Lesson 15: Observe 10th Grade Classroom (with pre- and post-class interviews)
    1Topic
  17. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Teaching the Great Books
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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  • What are some of the best ways to artfully integrate facts when you need to disseminate a lot of facts to students?
  • How do you disrupt students’ ease with a book and encourage them to consider their presuppositions without discouraging students from speaking? How do you disrupt with love so as to encourage more careful thought but NOT to discourage participation?
  • Josh Gibbs says that we often forget that what we eat effects our worldview (instead, we focus just on our worldview affecting what we eat). Why is this so important to remember in the classroom?