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Teaching Three Great Books

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  1. Introduction
    Teaching Three Great Books: Course Introduction (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
  2. Lessons
    Interview: Dr. Armetta on Literature and the Liberal Arts (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
  3. Lesson 1: An Overview
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 2: Huckleberry Finn—Part 1
    7 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 3: Huckleberry Finn—Part 2
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 4: Huckleberry Finn—Part 3
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 5: Huckleberry Finn—Part 4
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Discussion: Reading in Preparation for Teaching
  9. Lesson 6: Jane Eyre—Part 1
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 6A: Discussion
    1 Topic
  11. Lesson 7: Jane Eyre—Part 2
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 7A: Discussion
  13. Lesson 8: Jane Eyre—Part 3
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 8A: Discussion
    1 Topic
  15. Lesson 9: Jane Eyre—Part 4
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 10: Great Expectations—Part 1
    1 Topic
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Lesson 10A: Discussion
  18. Lesson 11: Great Expectations—Part 2
    1 Topic
  19. Lesson 12: Great Expectations—Part 3
    2 Topics
  20. Lesson 12A: Discussion
    1 Topic
  21. Lesson 13: Using Images to Teach Great Books
    2 Topics
  22. Lesson 13A: Discussion
  23. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Three Great Books
    1 Quiz
Lesson 11, Topic 4
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Discussion Questions

Lesson Progress
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  • How is it helpful for students to become aware of how classic literature has been discussed since the time of its writing? How might they understand their own ideas better when they see different responses to the ideas in the book since the time that it was published?
  • Which foils from great literature have you used to help define what a foil is in literature for your students?
  • Which passages from Jane Eyre have you had your students write about in order to illuminate a certain idea or aspect of a character for your students? What pedagogical insight can you share about how to guide your students in studying a character?