Back to Course

How to Teach History

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 1: What Is History and Why Study It? (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Discussion 1: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    1Topic
  3. Lesson 2: History and the Liberal Arts (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion 2: How to Teach History
    1Topic
  5. Lesson 3: The Role of History in Classical Education
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion 3: How to Teach History
    1Topic
  7. Lesson 4: Problems in the Study of History
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Discussion 4: How to Teach History
    2Topics
  9. Lesson 5: Developing as a Student of History
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion 5: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    2Topics
  11. Lesson 6: Essential Qualities and Practices of a History Teacher
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Discussion 6: How to Teach History
    1Topic
  13. Lesson 7: Important Books for the Study of History
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 8: Major Historians Teachers Should Know
    2Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 9: Two Ancient Historians---Livy
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 10: Two Ancient Historians---Bede
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Discussion 10: How to Teach History
    2Topics
  18. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test
    1 Quiz
Lesson 5, Topic 3
In Progress

Images: Christians Thinking Historically

Lesson Progress
0% Complete

In this lecture, Wes Callihan mentions several instances in which Christians took stock of the history that at preceded them as a way of acting in the present and forging the future.

Early Church fathers like Augustine reviewed and studied classical writers like Plato and found much to appreciate that was considered true and good. Some classical thought, however, was contrary to biblical teaching and thus rejected.

Alcuin of York was called by Charlemagne from England to France to reform education in the Holy Roman Empire.

Many during the Reformation and Counter-Reformation (including faithful Catholics) were seeking to address corruption in the Church by studying and appealing to the history of the Church.