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How to Teach History

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  1. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 1: What Is History and Why Study It? (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Discussion 1: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    1Topic
  3. Lesson 2: History and the Liberal Arts (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion 2: How to Teach History
    1Topic
  5. Lesson 3: The Role of History in Classical Education
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion 3: How to Teach History
    1Topic
  7. Lesson 4: Problems in the Study of History
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Discussion 4: How to Teach History
    2Topics
  9. Lesson 5: Developing as a Student of History
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion 5: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    2Topics
  11. Lesson 6: Essential Qualities and Practices of a History Teacher
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Discussion 6: How to Teach History
    1Topic
  13. Lesson 7: Important Books for the Study of History
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 8: Major Historians Teachers Should Know
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 9: Two Ancient Historians---Livy
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 10: Two Ancient Historians---Bede
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Discussion 10: How to Teach History
    2Topics
  18. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test
    1 Quiz
Lesson 13, Topic 2
In Progress

Images: Important Books for the Study and Teaching of History

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In this lecture, Wes Callihan notes several persons and books that he thinks are important for the study and teaching of history. After recommending travel and time as important teachers, he then lists several important writers on and of history: Barbara Tuchman (1912–1989), Russell Kirk (1918–1984), Gilbert Highet (1906–1978), C.S. Lewis (1898–1963), Edward Gibbon (1737–1794), WinstonChurchill (1874–1965), and Phillip Schaff (1819–1893).

Below are images of each of them and one of their books.