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How to Teach History

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  1. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 1: What Is History and Why Study It? (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Discussion 1: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    1 Topic
  3. Lesson 2: History and the Liberal Arts (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion 2: How to Teach History
    1 Topic
  5. Lesson 3: The Role of History in Classical Education
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion 3: How to Teach History
    1 Topic
  7. Lesson 4: Problems in the Study of History
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Discussion 4: How to Teach History
    2 Topics
  9. Lesson 5: Developing as a Student of History
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion 5: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
  11. Lesson 6: Essential Qualities and Practices of a History Teacher
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Discussion 6: How to Teach History
    1 Topic
  13. Lesson 7: Important Books for the Study of History
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 8: Major Historians Teachers Should Know
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 9: Two Ancient Historians---Livy
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 10: Two Ancient Historians---Bede
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  17. Discussion 10: How to Teach History
    2 Topics
  18. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test
    1 Quiz
Lesson 7, Topic 3
In Progress

Images: Two Historians and the Role of Bias

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In this lecture, Wes Callihan notes various problems we encounter when studying history. He mentions that some historians make their biases or “angles” clear in their writing and some do not. In some cases, we must read carefully to detect bias.

Wes notes that Tacitus (58–120) reveals a common bias when he wrote, “Enough time has passed that I need not fear retribution.” Apparently, historians are sometimes hesitant to record the bald truth when there are still people living who can do them harm.

Edward Gibbons (1737–1794) was an English historian of Roman history who wrote The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. While recognizes a masterful work of historical writing, his bias against organized Christianity and monasticism is clearly evident.