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How to Teach History

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  1. Lessons & Discussions
    Lesson 1: What Is History and Why Study It? (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  2. Discussion 1: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    1 Topic
  3. Lesson 2: History and the Liberal Arts (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Discussion 2: How to Teach History
    1 Topic
  5. Lesson 3: The Role of History in Classical Education
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Discussion 3: How to Teach History
    1 Topic
  7. Lesson 4: Problems in the Study of History
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Discussion 4: How to Teach History
    2 Topics
  9. Lesson 5: Developing as a Student of History
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Discussion 5: How to Teach History (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
  11. Lesson 6: Essential Qualities and Practices of a History Teacher
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Discussion 6: How to Teach History
    1 Topic
  13. Lesson 7: Important Books for the Study of History
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. Lesson 8: Major Historians Teachers Should Know
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  15. Lesson 9: Two Ancient Historians---Livy
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  16. Lesson 10: Two Ancient Historians---Bede
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  17. Discussion 10: How to Teach History
    2 Topics
  18. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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In this introductory lecture, Wes Callihan makes mention of the Washington monument that exists in the city of Baltimore, Maryland. The statue features George Washington dressed in a Roman toga and pointing to Annapolis (the state capitol). Like the Roman general Cincinnatus, Washington refused to become a monarch, instead handing in his resignation to the new American republic at the conclusion of the American Revolution. In the early 1800s, when this monument was erected, Americans knew their history and would have known just why Washington was dressed as a Roman—he was a modern-day Cincinnatus.