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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson 12, Topic 2
In Progress

Discussion Questions

Lesson Progress
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I. Introduction to Definitions and Disagreements
Units 2 and 3 provided lessons in reasoning in the abstract using categorical logic and symbols. Unit 4 now combines form with content. Explain how a study in definitions of terms is helpful for students applying logic in written and and oral expression and argumentation.

II. Types of Disagreements
Create some questions in your own words that would be helpful for students to consider when determining which type of disagreement they are facing. Review lesson 9.2, Deduction in Action, for some suggestions.

III. Rules for Defining Words
What parts of this lesson will prove most challenging for your future students (or typical students in general)? How do you think you can help them identify these challenges and overcome these obstacles?

IV. Types of Definitions
It is very common for students to find ambiguity in the theoretical, précising, and stipulative definitions. Consider the definitions provided in the text, and some of the exercises as well. How will you explain the differences between theoretical, précising, and stipulative definitions?

V. Extension vs. Intention
Consider which—extension or intension—you find to be most personally accessible. While in conversation or written expression, which of these do you most rely upon for explanation? Explain what, if any, challenges you will face in adopting and mastering both for the purposes of teaching this course.

VI. Presuppositional Disputes
(1) This section may be the most provocative to your students, as many of them will likely consider their presuppositions to be absolute truth, while they consider those held by their opponents to be illogical and factually incorrect. What, in your estimation, is the best way for students to approach presuppositional disputes?
(2) Are you absolutist in your thinking? Do you typically have an emotional response, manifested by feeling either threatened and/or defensive by opposing religious, political, or cultural positions? Given your answers, how do you intend to approach this chapter?

VII. Pursuing Truth
As the course nears conclusion and you consider how you will continue to engage your “world,” identify any ways you have changed or modified how that engagement will look.