Back to Course

Teaching Formal Logic

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson 9, Topic 3
In Progress

Discussion Questions

Lesson Progress
0% Complete

Relationships of Equivalence and Logical Equations

(1) Using the concept of mathematical equations (2 sides of an equation being in perfect, equal balance despite looking different), write an explanation describing why it can be helpful to study relationships of equivalence. Use the answer to this question as you formulate your lesson plan for this chapter.
(2) In what ways can writing and speaking in everyday language make argument translation difficult?
(3) Translate the following into a proposition in categorical form: Anna wasn’t wearing any jewelry. How does this sentence construction make translation difficult?
(4) Employing a different sentence construction, write an equivalent statement.
(5) Using the concepts of logical equivalence, explain why “No dogs are cats” AND “No cats are dogs” are both true, but “All dogs are mammals” is true, while “All mammals are dogs” is NOT true.
(6) Be contemplating the role of immediate inferences in obverse, converse, and contraposition conversions of propositions.