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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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(1) Make a list of your Educator’s Supplemental Curriculum—a course of study in tandem to your normal course preparations.
(2) Develop your course requirements from the perspective of your students. Consider the executive function skills necessary for students taking your course to succeed.
(3) Develop your orientation materials, specifically tailored to your course—synthesizing the executive function skills to course content and requirements.
(4) Create a Note-Taking Guide for your students to use in conjunction with The Discovery of Deduction (DD) over the course of the year. They should keep blank pages of this guide in a three-ring notebook dedicated to their DD course. They can then use the guide for each reading assignment you give them. It will be used in addition to the review questions found in DD.

This Note-Taking Guide should include:
(a) an area for them to list unfamiliar words, terms, ideas, or facts that are not addressed in the chapter review sections
(b) an area for them list sentences or paragraphs that they found difficult to understand
(c) an area for them to make connections and/or relate what they’ve read to their life or other studies
(d) an area for them to share their own questions that they considered while reading the text
(e) an area for them to summarize why this reading assignment was necessary and significant
(f) an area for them to identify the most interesting pieces of information they encountered while reading their assignment