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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson 11, Topic 3
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Assignments and Action Steps

Lesson Progress
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Create a lesson plan describing and explaining the following questions:
(1) Which objectives does this chapter fulfill?
(2) In what measurable ways can I assess how the students are not only learning, but also applying this objective?
(3) What does student success look like with regard to this objective?
(4) What dialectic should I integrate to enhance the objective?
(5) Which executive function skills should I expect of the students in approaching this objective?
(6) In what measurable ways can I assess the mastery of my integration, and the students’ approach to this objective?

Combining Skills
Consider the methods for testing validity presented in ch. 8. Write an explanation listing your preferred methods from highest to lowest. Be sure to include reasons for why you prefer one method over the other, the usefulness of the methods, which ones you think will present challenges to your students, and how you might combine methods to demonstrate them to the class.