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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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I. Preparing to teach a scholé course
(1) Why is it necessary to for a Discovery of Deduction educator to be engaging with the real world (politics, theology, philosophy, literature, movies, poetry, podcasts, etc.)?
(2) How are you “stocking” your mind?
(3) What kind of student are you?

II. Developing your pedagogical approach
(1) Do you wonder anything? What are you curious about? What discoveries have you made in the last week, month, or year?
(2) How is the classical learning process reflected in how you learn?
(3) Do you continue to be a classical student? If not, why not? And if so, in what ways?

III. Training your students to ask the right questions
(1) Is the myth about questions (the claim that there are no bad questions) true or false?
(2) What are the right questions to ask?
(3) How does learning to ask the right questions lead a student to discovering the argument?
(4) What executive function skills should be expected from the classical student?

IV. Miscellaneous questions
(1) Why is formal logic regarded as an art?
(2) In what ways does logic enable us to learn or study virtually any subject?
(3) What is the difference between an art and a science?
(4) What is the difference between formal and informal logic?