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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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I. Helping Your Students Appreciate the History of Formal Logic
(1) How does the history and evolution of logic help The Discovery of Deduction (DD) educator prepare for the classroom?
(2) How will you explain the importance of validity in argumentation, and not merely the passions and facts, when crafting an argument with regard to taking a position on an issue, do you personally believe that it’s not only important to be correct, but also that your argument is constructed validly?

II. Similarities between Geometric Study and Future Logical Study
(1) In the twenty-first century, what axioms are there left on which we can collectively agree as “givens”?
(2) What special challenges does the postmodern, relativist thinking pose for students of logic?
(3) Could you argue that a study in formal logic can be a tool used by the student not only for his academic goals, but also for his faith/life/worldview goals?

III. Limits of Categorical/Aristotelian Logic
(1) How will you show your true mettle in handling the “trick” questions posed by your students as they test the limits and strength of categorical/Aristotelian logic?
(2) Consider the examples given in class and read Lewis’s example from The Problem of Pain. Write an explanation for these types of paradox/nonsense examples, appropriating them correctly as important, but useful, to the study of DD.

IV. Logic: The Tool to Making Sense of Chaos and Confusion (a theme that should resonate with students)
Explain the correlation between the executive function skills of the dialectic student and the study of informal logic. How does this academic stage align with the foundational goals of DD?