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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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I. Human Nature Revealed in Logical Thinking
(1) What are the primary ways humans are distinct from other creatures, and from technology, that can mimic aspects of the three acts of the mind?
(2) Considering the “average” dialectic-level student, which of these three acts will provide the most significant struggle for consistent application?
(3) Do you think your students “know” themselves well enough at this level of introspection to be able to cognitively learn this information? Are they capable of directly applying their thought/term/proposition/argument development in and outside of this course?

II. The Act of Simple Apprehension Given: The ultimate goal in this course is valid syllogism construction; the ability to accurately and consistently apply the concepts of simple apprehension is required for mastery.
(1) Given that, how does vocabulary development play a role in formal logic?
(2) Given that, how does having a “well-stocked mind” factor into simple apprehension?

III. The Act of Judgment, Class, Inclusion, Forming Propositions
As Adler and Van Doren state, “you will need to give some answers to the truth and significance” of a concept/content. Only after truth and significance have been determined can terms accurately relate and propositions be formed. Given that, how well do you think your students can accurately judge the content they encounter?

IV. The Act of Inference, Building Arguments, Drawing Conclusions
The act of inference is the basis for developing thesis statements, arguments, and drawing conclusions—all of which rests on the students’ ability to accurately understand and judge content. Given that, describe the significance of mastering formal logic in relationship to all other disciplines.