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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson 4, Topic 4
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Assignments and Action Steps

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II. How to Review Informal Logic with Students taking DD
Find and/or create three examples of inductive arguments. Analyze these arguments, determining what informal fallacies might be present. Craft a presentation that will explain to students how the argument begins with individual facts and works to reason toward a generalization. If the argument contains a fallacy, be prepared to show how the argument is weaker because the speaker deviates from proving the issue at hand by interjecting either an irrelevancy, a presumption, or a lack of clarity into his reasoning.

II. Formal Logic: Discovering Deduction
Create your own metaphorical example to explain why form is equally necessary to constructing a sound argument. Be sure to evaluate your metaphor to be sure it’s constructed correctly: A –> a  B –> b  C –> c (see Corbett if possible).