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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson 8, Topic 3
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Discussion Questions

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I. Introduction to the Square of Opposition
(1) How does learning the square of opposition help a student to understand the implications of a priori truths?
(2) How are inference and implications used to help logically evaluate and analyze propositions?
(3) Why is this learning tool called the square of opposition?
(4) How can the use of grid-based, deductive logic puzzles help illustrate how to navigate through determining AEIO propositional truth and falsity?

II. Contradiction
Describe the colloquial misuses of the term “contradiction,” and then describe how you intend to explain logical contradiction.

III. Contrariety and Subcontrariety
Compare/contrast the definitions “contrary” and “contrariety.” Be prepared to explain the subtle differences between the two. These are commonly confused terms.

IV. Subimplication and Superimplication
(1) Explain why all blueberries are berries, but not all berries are blueberries.
(2) Why does the truth of universals flow to the corresponding particulars, but the truth of particulars does not flow to the corresponding universals?
(3) Explain why the falsity of particulars flows to the corresponding universals, but the falsity of universals does not flow to the corresponding particulars.