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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
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    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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I. In preparation to engage any text or argument, be ready to answer:
(1) What are the informal fallacies being utilized in the argument (refer to The Art of Argument for review)?
(2) Are you able to construct the author’s syllogism? If so, is the author’s construction valid or invalid?
(3) Are you able to identify the author’s key terms in her argument? If so, what type of definitions does the author employ?
(4) What are the author’s presuppositions, axioms, and worldview?

II. Enter into a relaxed, reasoned conversation with the author as you make your way through the text. In what key places do you agree? Differ? Why? How can you avoid making the same mistakes you may accuse the author of?