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Teaching Formal Logic

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  1. Lessons
    Lesson 1: Teaching Logic Restfully with Rigor (Preview Content)
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  2. Lesson 2: Logic as a Core Discipline (Preview Content)
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  3. Discussion: Logic in One's Life and Study (Preview Content)
    2 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. Lesson 3: Formal Logic vs. Informal Logic
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. Lesson 4: The Classical Origin and Medieval Recovery of Logic
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. Lesson 5: Formal Logic and the Three Acts of the Mind
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. Lesson 6: Translating Arguments into Categorical Form
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  8. Lesson 7: Relationships of Opposition
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  9. Lesson 8: Relationships of Equivalence
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  10. Lesson 9: Categorical Syllogisms
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  11. Lesson 10: Determining Validity of Syllogisms
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  12. Lesson 11: Terms and Definitions
    3 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  13. Lesson 12: Developing the End-of-Year Project
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  14. End of Course Test
    End of Course Test: Formal Logic
    1 Quiz
Lesson Progress
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I. Changing Gears: Unit 2
(1) Discuss the pedagogical changes you intend to make by shifting from unit 1 to unit 2 content.

II. Categorical Form
(1) Why is translation into categorical form necessary?
(2) Describe the end goal in translating arguments into categorical form.

III. Kinds of Propositions
(1) How can you teach students the differences between facts and opinions?
(2) Why is it essential to know “why you believe what you believe”?
(3) Describe “truth value” in your own words—how will you explain it to students?

IV. Steps to Translating Arguments
(1) Describe the importance of being able to identify the key terms in an argument and how this skill relates back to the three acts of the mind.
(2) Affirmo and nego, as well as AEIO (which will be useful in ch. 5).
(3) Explain the importance of governing the use of absolutes/universals, both in your own expression and in the expression of your students.
(4) Explain the importance of finding the subject term and the predicate term.